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Greater Adjutant

Birds Receive Endangered Species Protection

The rule implements federal protections provided by the ESA for the Cantabrian capercaillie, Marquesan imperial pigeon, Eiao Marquesas reed-warbler, greater adjutant, Jerdon’s courser, and slender-billed curlew.

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Banded Short-tail Albatross

Nesting Short-Tailed Albatross Mark Milestone

If the pair’s breeding effort is successful at Midway Atoll Refuge, it would mark the first confirmed hatching of a short-tailed albatross outside of Japan in modern history.

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Bat with White Nose Syndrome

Deadly White-Nose Syndrome Spread Slowed by Cave Closures

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has completed a report recommending closing human access to caves and mines where bats with white-nose syndrome are hibernating in an area more than 250 miles from other WNS-affected caves and mines.

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The Oldest Bird in the Northern Hemisphere Raises a Chick

Oldest US Wild Bird is a New Mother

The oldest known U.S. wild bird – a coyly conservative 60 — is a new mother. The bird, a Laysan albatross named Wisdom, was …

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Bats with Tell Tale signs of WNS

Wing Fungus Has Lethal Effects on Bats With White Nose Syndrome

Damage to bat wings from the fungus associated with white-nose syndrome (WNS) may cause catastrophic imbalance in life-support processes, according to newly published research. …

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Settler deforestation increased coastal sediment contributing to large New England marshes

Large New England Marshes Likely Created By Settlers

Researchers found that deforestation in the New England area at that time produced significant soil erosion, increasing sediment delivery rates — the natural flow of sand and soil in water systems. The large amounts of sediment traveling in rivers and streams to the coastline spurred a significant period of wetland growth, leading to marshes lining the coast of New England that today are abnormally large.

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